Programming, Python, Ruby

Truly open classes

Here’s an interesting observation, I needed to write a little script to automate some number calculating for me. I was wondering whether to do it in Ruby or Python. I’m doing a lot of Python at the moment so I felt I ought to give Ruby a little go. Share some of the love.

However the solution I had in mind really didn’t work with Ruby because while Ruby has open classes it has a comparatively fixed idea of attributes. In Python you can set attributes very freely on any object so I have got in the habit of creating something and then enhancing by applying a function. Example? Okay.

def make_captain(actor):
actor.rank = "Captain"
return actor

class Person:
pass

captain = make_captain(Person())

So this little trick doesn’t work, or rather is much more difficult to do in Ruby as Ruby, at is dynamic heart, is a language that believes in object-orientation and that classes should encapsulate rather than being little collections of data. You can use instance_variable_get/set but it lacks the elegance of the Python syntax.

In Ruby it would be easier to define the attributes in the class using the existing metaprogramming constructs and then have a class method to generate the content (effectively encapsulating my script logic).

Now this isn’t a straight “Ruby sux, no Python sux more” post. Between Scala, Clojure and Python I have been doing a lot more in a functional style that depreciates objects as anything more than value carriers. The Ruby vision of a class would give me something with a stronger sense of purpose and encapsulation, something that is hard to benefit from in a script for a particular purpose.

What is going to be interesting this year is trying to identify when the value of a piece of code is in the structure of it’s data-definition (i.e. objects) versus its process (functions). Having had a think about it I should perhaps rewrite my script to use some OO modelling because it may answer similar requirements down the line. However from a strict Lean/Waste point of view I should have gone with the Python solution as Ruby was imposing a restriction on me while providing benefits that I was unlikely to realise.

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