Programming

Google Cloud Functions

I managed to get onto the Google Cloud Functions (GCF) alpha so I’ve had a chance to experiment with it for a while. The functionality is now in beta and seems to be generally available.

GCF is a cloud functions, functions as a service, AWS Lambda competitor. However thanks to launching after Lambda it has the advantage of being able to refine the offering rather than cloning it.

The major difference between GCF and Lambda is that GCF allows functions to be bound to HTTP triggers trivially and exposes HTTPS endpoints almost without configuration. There’s no messing around with API Gateway here.

The best way I can describe the product is that it brings together the developer experience of App Engine with the on-demand model of Lambda.

Implementing a Cloud Function

The basic HTTP-triggered cloud function is based on Express request handling. Essentially the function is just a single handler. Therefore creating a new endpoint is trivial.

Dependencies are automagically handled by use of a package.json file in the root of the function code.

I haven’t really bothered with local testing, partly because I’ve been hobby-programming but also because each function is so dedicated the functionality should be trivial.

For JSON endpoints you write a module that takes input and generates a JSON-compatible object and test that. You then marshal the arguments in the Express handler and use the standard JSON response to send the result of the module call back to the user.

Standard