Software

In praise of fungible developers

The “fungibility” of developers is a bit of hot topic at the moment. Fungibility means the ability to substitute one thing for another for the same effect; so money is fungible for goods in modern economies.

In software development that means taking a developer in one part of the organisation and substituting them elsewhere and not impacting the productivity of either developer involved in the exchange.

This is linked to the mythical “full-stack” developer by the emergence of different “disciplines” within web software development, usually these are: devops, client-side (browser-based development) and backend development (services).

It is entirely possible for developers to enter one of these niches and spend all their time in it. In fact sub-specialisations in things like responsive CSS and single-page apps (SPA) are opening up.

Now my view has always been that a developer should always aspire to have as broad a knowledge base as possible and to be able to turn their hand to anything. I believe when you don’t really understand what is going on around your foxhole then problems occur. Ultimately we are all pushing electric pulse-waves over wires and chips and it is worth remembering that.

However my working history was pretty badly scarred by the massive wave of Indian outsourcing that happened post the year 2000 and as a consequence the move up the value-chain that all the remaining onshore developers made. Chad Fowler’s book is a pretty good summary of what happened and how people reacted to it.

For people getting specialist pay for niche work, full-stack development doesn’t contain much attraction. Management sees fungibility as a convenient way of pushing paper resources around projects and then blaming developers for not delivering. There are also some well-written defences of specialisation.

In defence of broad skills

But I still believe that we need full-stack developers and if you don’t like that title then let’s call them holistic developers.

Organisations do need fungibility. Organisations without predictable demand or who are experiencing disruption in their business methodology need to be flexible and they need to respond to situations that are unexpected.

You also need to fire drill those situations where people leave, fall ill or have a family crisis. Does the group fall apart or can it readjust and continue to deliver value? In any organisation you never know when you need to change people round at short notice.

Developers with a limited skill set are likely to make mistakes that someone with a broader set of experiences wouldn’t. It is also easier for a generalist developer to acquire specialist knowledge when needed than to broaden a specialist.

Encouraging specialism is the same as creating knowledge silos in your organisation. There are times when this might be acceptable but if you aren’t doing it in a conscious way and accompanying it with a risk assessment then it is dangerous.

Creating holistic developers

Most organisations have an absurd reward structure that massively benefits specialists rather than generalists. You can see that in iOS developer and mobile responsive web CSS salaries. The fact that someone is less capable than their colleagues means they are rewarded more. This is absurd and it needs to end.

Specialists should be treated like contractors and consultants. They have special skills but you should be codifying their knowledge and having them train their generalist colleagues. A specialist should be seen as a short-term investment in an area where you lack institutional memory and knowledge.

All software delivery organisations should practice rotation. Consider it a Chaos Monkey for your human processes.

Rotation puts things like onboarding processes to the test. It also brings new eyes to the solution and software design of the team. If something is simple it should make sense and be simply to newcomer, not someone who has been on the team for months.

Rotation applies within teams too. Don’t give functionality to the person who can deliver it the fastest, give it to the person who would struggle to deliver it. Then force the rest of the team to support that person. Make them see the weaknesses in what they’ve created.

Value generalists and go out of your way to create them.

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Work

Breaking the two-week release cycle

I gave a lightning talk about some of the work I did last year at the Guardian to help break the website out of the two-week release cycle and make it possible to switch to a feature-release based process. It’s the first time I’ve given a public talk about it although I have discussed with friends and obviously within the Guardian as well where we are still talking about how best to adopt this.

I definitely think that feature-releasing is the the only viable basis for effectively software delivery, whether you are doing continuous delivery or not.

In a short talk there’s a lot you have to leave out but the questions in the pub afterwards were actually relatively straight-forward. The only thing I felt I didn’t necessarily get across (despite saying it explicitly) was that this work was done on the big Enterprise Java monolith at the Guardian. We aren’t talking about microapps or our new mobile platform (although they too are released on a feature basis rather than on a cycle) we are talking about the application that is sometimes referred to as the “Monolith”. It was really about changing the world to make it better rather than avoid difficulty and accepting the status quo.

Feature-releasing has real benefits for supporting and maintaining software. On top of this, if you want to achieve collective team effort then focussing on a feature it going to better rather than doing a swath of work in a mini-waterfall “sprint”. The team stands a better chance of building up a release momentum and cadence and from that building up stakeholder confidence and a reputation for responsive delivery.

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